The Basics of Snowshoeing

Updated on June 2, 2016
Snowshoeing through the Santanoni Range, Adirondack High Peaks.
Snowshoeing through the Santanoni Range, Adirondack High Peaks. | Source

Introduction

Since the introduction of the modern decked snowshoe, snowshoeing has grown immensely in popularity among winter sports enthusiasts and amateurs alike. For people looking for a physically demanding and soul soothing fitness activity to start the New Year off right, they should try strapping on a pair of snowshoes.

I worked in outdoor retail for years and each year people would would walk up to the snowshoe display and stare with an inquisitive yet dumfounded glare at the myriad shapes and sizes of snowhsoes. As I greeted them, awakening them from their snowshoe stupor, they usually asked, "How do you go snowshoeing?"

Though the physical mechanism of snowshoeing is simple, just place one foot in front of the other, there are a few things you need to know before getting started for a fun and safe snowshoeing experience.


The snowshoe you choose depends upon your weight and the terrain in which you'll be hiking.  In the above picture, me in a pair of Atlas 1025 snowshoes.
The snowshoe you choose depends upon your weight and the terrain in which you'll be hiking. In the above picture, me in a pair of Atlas 1025 snowshoes. | Source
Heel lifts, like this one on the Tubbs Mountaineer make climbing much easier on your legs.
Heel lifts, like this one on the Tubbs Mountaineer make climbing much easier on your legs. | Source

Selecting Snowshoes

Snowshoes are varied and as bountiful as the stars and it is overwhelming when you start to shop for them. To make things easier remember the following rules:

  1. The larger the snowshoe the more floatation you have (ie - the more weight is displaces). The more floatation you have, the less you sink in the snow.
  2. The larger the snowshoe the heavier the weight on your feet. The more weight on your feet the more energy you expend and the harder it is to walk.

When shopping for snowshoes, you'll need to know two things:

  • How much weight, including gear and yourself, will you be carrying?
  • Each manufacturer lists a recommended size (in inches) for the amount of weight to be carried. This however is not gospel: I range from 25-inch to 36-inch models myself based on the conditions in which I am hiking.
  • How and where do you plan on using your snowshoes?
  • Besides length based on weight, snowshoes are also sold according to usage. If you plan on sticking to the local park, you can get away with a pair of recreational models. However, if you plan on venturing into the backcountry, you will need a model designed for hard use with stronger materials and more aggressive crampons.

I have several models of snowshoes based on the conditions I plan on hiking in. In deep unbroken powder when I'm wearing a heavy pack, I'll wear my monster Tubbs 36-inch Mountaineers. In moderate conditions, with heavy trail breaking I'll wear the 30-inch Atlas 1030 model. With broken out trails and with lots of climbing I'll wear a 25-inch like the Tubbs Mountaineer 25, the Atlas 1025, or the Tubbs Alp Pro 25.

Some snowshoes like the MSR Denali (below) have adjustable length tails available so you can modify the shoe for any condition.

Snowshoe Crampons

Snowshoe crampons make walking on ice and climbing very easier.  Left, Tubbs Mountaineers / Right, Tubbs, TRK
Snowshoe crampons make walking on ice and climbing very easier. Left, Tubbs Mountaineers / Right, Tubbs, TRK | Source

Check out the modular snowshoe system from MSR

I use Leki Super Makalu poles like these here year around.  I just change out the baskets to "mud baskets" after the snow melts.
I use Leki Super Makalu poles like these here year around. I just change out the baskets to "mud baskets" after the snow melts. | Source

Snowshoe Poles

Though many people associate poles with skiing, they aid greatly in snowshoeing as well. Why do they help? Well, why gliding over slick surfaces and over uneven terrain, four legs are always better than two. Besides the obvious benefit to balance, you also gain additional propulsion by using your arms to push you forward.

Still not convinced about poles? Walk over to a chair and step up onto it - notice the amount of stress placed on your knee. Now grab a couple of brooms, hold them perpendicular to the floor and repeat the stair stepping exercise. Notice how much easier it was to climb with the addition of the poles.

Characteristics of a good snowshoeing pole:

  1. Sturdy construction
  2. Reputable Brand: Leki, Komperdell, Black Diamond
  3. Wide powder/snowflake baskets
  4. Adjustable length for varying conditions

To use poles why snowshoeing, adjust the length so with elbows bent at a 90-degree angle you lower arms are parallel to the ground. As you walk, swing the pole opposite of the foot moving forward and plant into snow. Alternate pole plants as stride increases.


Snowshoeing Boots

Though some manufacturers have marketed binding specific boots that clip into snowshoes like skis, the majority of snowshoes don't require a specific type of boot. I've worn snowshoes with gore-tex trail runners and I've worn them with stiff mountaineering boots. The beauty of the universal bindings is that you can wear the type of footwear you need for the conditions you are facing.

Generally, for most people, the best boot for snowshoeing is a winter hiking boot. A winter hiking boot that you plan on using for snowshoeing should have the following features:

  • Made of waterproof /breathable materials
  • Light insulation like 200-400 grams of thinsulate or equivalent -if the boots are too warm, your feet will sweat too much.
  • A snowshoe binding heel - many winter hiking boots have plastic ridges along the back of the heel to grab the binding better.
  • Gaiter hooks - Most people wear gaiters while snowshoeing and these hooks below the laces will help keep your gaiters in place.
  • I, and many other snowshoers, prefer a boot which is a mid or ankle-high cut. Even when the snow is deep, you don't need a high boot. Augment your lower boots with gaiters to keep the snow out of your boots.

Snowshoeing in the Adirondack Colvin Range in April.  Note the gaiters: they do a fantastic job of keeping your lower legs dry and snow out of your boots.
Snowshoeing in the Adirondack Colvin Range in April. Note the gaiters: they do a fantastic job of keeping your lower legs dry and snow out of your boots. | Source

Clothing for Snowshoeing

When I take people snowshoeing for the first time, there is usually one problem with their clothing - they are wearing far too much. After trudging through the snow for fifteen minutes I turn to them, as the sweat soaks their clothing and pours off their brow, and ask them, "I bet you wish you weren't wearing that heavy parka now."

However, given the potential danger of winter weather, you can't venture out in just your skivvies either. The trick is to utilize a technical clothing system.

Remember the following pointers:

  • Synthetics or Wool:

Wet clothing, either from snow or sweat, makes you colder; therefore, wear clothing made from synthetic materials or wool which retain thermal properties even when wet. Make sure you take care of synthetics according to their care label and clean them regularly to enhance performance.

  • Layers:

Several light layers will keep you warmer than one thick layer. When dressed in layers it is easy to trap air (which is easier to warm) in between the layers.

Also as your level of energy increases and decreases, it is easy to peel off or add a layer to maintain thermal regulation in your body.

Remember your system should contain a wicking layer, an insulation layer, and a weather layer.

  • Hats, Gloves, Mittens, and Balaclavas:

Grandma use to always yell at you when you didn't wear a hat - and for good reason. Your head is a collection of blood vessels and acts as a major radiation point for your body.

In order to regulate heat, you'll probably find in necessary to carry a couple hats and facemasks of varying weight. As energy output increases put on a lighter hat then if you stop to take a break - put your heavier hat back on.

Hands also rapidly change temperature. My favorite system is to wear a pair of lightweight water-resistant/breathable liner gloves with an overmitt. Use removable wool or synthetic liners in the mitts when conditions get colder.

If you are planning on going above treeline and plan on switching into crampons, make sure you bring straps to secure your snowshoes to your pack.
If you are planning on going above treeline and plan on switching into crampons, make sure you bring straps to secure your snowshoes to your pack. | Source

Safety Equipment

Always ask yourself before leaving the trailhead, "Am I prepared to spend the night, in case I get hurt?"

The things you should always carry on any outdoor activity are called the "Ten Essentials" and you can read a full article on these items HERE.

At the least, carry the following items in your backpack:

  • Water in an insulated holder and high-energy food
  • Extra clothing - layers
  • Headlamp
  • Pocketknife
  • Compass
  • Map
  • Sun Protection - yes, even in winter
  • First aid kit
  • Matches/lighter
  • Fire starter
  • Emergency blanket though I prefer a space-type bivy for winter
  • Whistle

The Outbound Dan Human Critical Four:

  1. Knife
  2. Compass
  3. Whistle
  4. Fire Starting System

For winter backpackers, you may want to check out my complete Winter Packing List.

Where to go Snowshoeing

So you have snowshoes, the proper clothing, and safety equipment - now you just need a place to go. The great things about snowshoeing, unlike cross country skiing, is that you can pretty much do it anywhere you can walk when there isn't snow on the ground.

As a reminder, watch your local trail heads for "ski-only" trails. Though snowshoes are nowhere near as destructive as not wearing snowshoes to the local trail snowpack, it is still difficult to ski through the depressions that snowshoes make. So if the trail says, "ski only" and you are not wearing skis - please stay off.

As a cross country skier and a snowshoer myself, I have a dream that someday snowshoers and skiers will live in harmony.

This page © Copyright 2011, Dan Human

Have you ever been snowshoeing?

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Questions & Answers

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      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        Thanks travel2 and yes it is amazing what you can find on hubpages. If you ever want to try snowshoeing, most winter resort-type areas rent them out. Check it out the next time you are traveling.

      • travel2 profile image

        travel2 

        6 years ago from London, England

        Wow never heard of this before, now I want a go! Amazing what you can find on hubpages. Great stuff

      • profile image

        Hapklein 

        6 years ago

        Dave Reling showed the way about fifteen years ago. He left the Loj, skied out Indian pass on skinnies, crossed Henderson Pond to flowed lands on fats, then snowshoed to the peak of Marcy at 4:30 and skied on the skinnies to the Loj by 6:30 PM.

        The last time I did Avalanche was the same mix. Climbed up on snowshoes and skied down on skinnies.

        Do what you can, while you can when your 77 you have fabulous memories and no regrets. enjoy!

      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        Thanks for sharing Hap! You are right, I probably see one skier for every ten snowshoers up in the High Peaks.

        I figure I probably only use my skis once for every ten times I go snowshoeing.

      • profile image

        Hapklein 

        6 years ago

        I am pleased and amazed at the success of snowshoes. During the 70's &80's they were just at the margin of x-country ski's. But during the 90's they gained popularity and the last time I skied through Avalanch Pass in 2001, there were more snowshoers than skiers.

        But more importantly more people.

        I liked teaching snow shoeing more that x-country skiing. People pick it up easier.

        My experience? On my first snowshoes I ran a trapline on Ellicott Creek, 1947 to 1950.

      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        I am pretty sure that is you. At first I thought it was me, but I'm not that quick with my timer and I don't have a burgundy jacket. That was taken during our very snowy Santanoni attempt.

      • profile image

        Algonquin Bob 

        6 years ago

        Great article. Is that me in the first photo?

      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        Thanks for stopping by Thoughtforce! And yes, snowshoeing is a lot of fun and a great way to enjoy a little time outside during the winter months.

      • thougtforce profile image

        Christina Lornemark 

        6 years ago from Sweden

        Great information and inspiration! I know about old wooden snowshoes but I have never heard of snowshoeing in this way. It sounds fun though, and something I can see myself doing. Maybe I can even start to enjoy winter and snow! Voted up, interesting and useful

        Tina

      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        Thanks moonlake! The old wooden snowshoes work too - I used them for years while growing up. The newer shoes though are lighter, have better floatation, and are easier to walk in. Plus the bindings are way better now. But any snowshoe is better than no snowshoe.

      • moonlake profile image

        moonlake 

        6 years ago from America

        I have never went snowshoeing but my husband use to. We have sets of the old snowshoes.

        Great hub.

      • Outbound Dan profile imageAUTHOR

        Dan Human 

        6 years ago from Niagara Falls, NY

        Thanks! I have hosted seminars on snowshoeing and winter backpacking before.

      • cclitgirl profile image

        Cynthia Calhoun 

        6 years ago from Western NC

        Wow! You could open a "school" doing this. :)

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