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Trails and Hiking in Kalamoir Regional Park in West Kelowna

I am an avid hiker with a focus on easy to moderate trails in natural settings. I occasionally do harder trails.

Kalamoir Regional Park in West Kelowna. This shows a viewpoint from a high part of the trail network in the park. The view is toward the east and overlooks Okanagan Lake. This picture is a still taken from a video that was filmed June 29th, 2020.

Kalamoir Regional Park in West Kelowna. This shows a viewpoint from a high part of the trail network in the park. The view is toward the east and overlooks Okanagan Lake. This picture is a still taken from a video that was filmed June 29th, 2020.

An Amazing Trail Network in West Kelowna

Kalamoir Regional Park in West Kelowna owns a pretty solid reputation. At the time of writing, Google Reviews for this park averaged out to a solid 4.7 out of 5.0 based on 199 reviews.

I visited this Okanagan Lake park in 2020 and certainly would not hesitate to visit it again. It offered an amazing combination of challenging hiking, satisfying scenery, and comfortable swimming

Kalamoir Regional Park is in the same general area as Mount Boucherie, a small mountain in West Kelowna with its own trail network. There isn't as much elevation in Kalamoir Regional Park as there is at Mount Boucherie. However, I still felt like I got a great workout. Both parks overlook Lake Okanagan.

Small but Satisfying Trail Network

The trail network in Kalamoir Region Park is kind of small. I didn't investigate the whole park by any stretch but it's a great place to go if you want to get an hour of exercise in or a little more. When it came to going off of the beaten path, I didn't see many opportunities. In fact, in this park going on a diversion is akin to just going down the slope so be sure to stay on the marked trail.

The trails weren't all that wide and, although I never saw a cyclist, I did see some bike tracks on the trail. That's not great news for hikers: if cyclists come ripping through then it would be nice to have a spot to step aside. I felt like the narrow trails could make that difficult at some points in the park's path.

From the lofty heights of the trail network, you could spot some of the secret little beaches that are in the area. Lake Okanagan itself certainly isn't a secret so the beaches can be crowded. Finding a tiny spot with some private sand might be exactly what most people are going for. Using this trail network can help you do that.

In the following video, I show the beauty of the area. It's a longer video than most of my videos. You get a good look at the parking lot, the trailhead map, the trail width, the shoreside area, and the viewpoints that you can expect. I would certainly welcome a chance to get back to this park in the future.

Kalamoir Regional Park in West Kelowna

Wildfire Safety in This Region

West Kelowna is in the interior of British Columbia and part of the greater area of Kelowna, a small city in Canada's west. The interior of British Columbia often experiences a devastating wildfire season. Those that are looking to go trail hiking in this area may not be able to do so at certain times of year any longer.

In fact, my trail hiking in 2021 took me out of BC entirely because of a multitude of factors. Firstly, there were surprise highway closures. Secondly, there were issues with trails being closed by fire marshalls. Lastly, if you are in any part of the interior of BC during the summer season and it's a bad year for wildfires, it's not a great feeling to be worried about short-notice evacuations and then dealing with the fleeing traffic.

My travel tip for hikers that want to enjoy the Okanagan area is not to do so during the summer season any longer. Wildfires can still happen in the spring and fall but, nonetheless, that's probably where you should be aiming for hiking in this part of Canada.

The summertime has too many inconveniences now and that could be a permanent fixture so long as we keep ignoring global warming. May and then late September are probably good times of year to visit the Okanagan for hiking purposes. If you do go in June, July, or August then check wildfire conditions first. Don't be surprised if you get to your trailhead of choice only to see an unfriendly sign advising you not to proceed on the trail.

This content reflects the personal opinions of the author. It is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and should not be substituted for impartial fact or advice in legal, political, or personal matters.

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