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The Eight-Thousanders: 14 Highest Mountain Peaks in the World

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Amara is a blogger and a writer. She loves adventures, and to explore new places.

The Eight-Thousanders, 14 Highest Mountain Peaks in the world.

The Eight-Thousanders, 14 Highest Mountain Peaks in the world.

The Tallest Mountains in the World

Eight-thousanders are the 14 highest mountain peaks in the world, that are more than 8000 metres or 26,247 ft in height above sea level, according to the International Mountaineering and Climbing Federation or UIAA. All these highest peaks are located in the Himalayan and Karakorum mountain ranges in Asia.

Names of the 14 Highest Mountain Peaks in the World

  1. Mount Everest
  2. K2
  3. Kangchenjunga
  4. Lhotse
  5. Makalu
  6. Cho Oyu
  7. Dhaulagiri I
  8. Manaslu
  9. Nanga Parbat
  10. Annapurna I
  11. Gasherbrum I
  12. Broad Peak
  13. Gasherbrum II
  14. Shishapangma

First Climbers to Summit All 14 Peaks

  • Reinhold Messner: An Italian climber, became the first person to summit all 14 eight-thousanders in 1986, without the aid of supplementary oxygen.
  • Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner: An Austrian climber, became the first woman to summit all 14 eight-thousanders in 2011, without the aid of supplementary oxygen.
Mount Everest

Mount Everest

1. Mount Everest

  • Height: 8,848 m (29,029 ft)
  • Location: Nepal-China
  • First ascent: 29 May 1953
  • Death rate: 1.52%

Physical Traits and Challenges

Located in the Mahalangur Himal sub-range of the Himalayas, and a height of 8,848 metres, Mount Everest is the world's tallest mountain. It is a point of attraction for climbers, around the world.

There are two main routes to reach the summit, one from the southeast in Nepal, which is called the standard route, and the other from the north in Tibet.

While the standard route does not pose many technical climbing challenges, but it still presents dangers like severe weather conditions, wind, altitude sickness, and significant hazards from ice-fall and avalanches.

First Ascent

The first recorded efforts to reach the summit of Everest were made by two British mountaineers, named Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay on May 29th, 1953.

K2 aka the Savage Mountain

K2 aka the Savage Mountain

2. K2

  • Height: 8,611 m (28,251 ft)
  • Location: Pakistan-China
  • First ascent: 31 July 1954
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

At the height of 8,611 metres above sea level, K2 is the world's second-highest peak. Located in the Karakorum mountain range, in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, and the Xinjiang region of China, it is also known as the savage mountain.

Of the five highest mountains in the world, K2 is the deadliest one and the most challenging of all to climb. This notorious mountain takes the life of one for every four who reach the summit.

There are many routes to reach the summit but the most adopted route is from Abruzzi spur and is called the standard route, the other routes are almost unapproachable. Even the easiest route from Abruzzi spur is treacherous and full of dangers of extreme weather conditions, rockfalls, and avalanches.

First Ascent

The mountain was first successfully climbed by Achille Compagnoni, and Lino Lacedelli on 31 July 1954.

Kangchenjunga

Kangchenjunga

3. Kangchenjunga

  • Height: 8,586 m (28,169 ft)
  • Location: Nepal-India
  • First ascent: 25 May 1955
  • Death rate: 3.00%

Physical Traits and Challenges

With an elevation of 8,586 metres, Kangchenjunga is the third highest mountain in the world. It lies in the Himalayan mountain range between India and Nepal.

Until 1852, it was assumed to be the world's tallest mountain, but later in 1856, it was concluded as the third highest mountain in the world.

There are four routes to reach the summit, of which three are in Nepal, from northwest to northeast and southwest, and one from northeastern Sikkim in India. The Indian side route has been closed since 2000, so all the routes to the summit are in Nepal.

The mountain is composed of rocks of Neoproterozoic to Ordovician age, which is about 445 million to 1 billion years old. It receives a heavier snowfall in the summer monsoon season and lighter snowfall in winter.

First Ascent

It was first climbed by Joe Brown and George Band on 25 May 1955.

Lhotse

Lhotse

4. Lhotse

  • Height: 8,516 m (27,940 ft)
  • Location: Nepal-China
  • First ascent: 18 May 1956
  • Death rate: 1.03%

Physical Traits and Challenges

Lhotse is the world's fourth-highest peak at 8,516 metres, located in the Himalayan mountain range between Nepal and China. In Tibetan, Lhotse means "South Peak."

The Lhotse climbing route follows the same path as Everest, up to the Yellow Band beyond Camp 3, and is known as the standard route. Lhotse is a stiff climb, and the path consists of steep ice and rock, but It is considered as one of the achievable 8,000 mountains.

The south face of Lhotse is considered one of the great mountain walls of the Himalayas, which is a challenge for experienced mountaineers with over 3000m/10,000m of steep high-altitude rock climbing.

First Ascent

The first ascent to the main summit was made by a Swiss team of Fritz Luchsinger and Ernst Reiss, on 18 May 1956.

Makalu

Makalu

5. Makalu

  • Height: 8,485 m (27,838 ft)
  • Location: Nepal-China
  • First ascent: 15 May 1955
  • Death rate: 1.63%

Physical Traits and Challenges

At 8,485 metres, Makalu is the fifth highest mountain in the world. This isolated four-sided pyramid-shaped mountain is located in the southeast of Mount Everest on the border of Nepal and the Tibet Autonomous Region of China.

Makalu is one the most technical and harder eight-thousander and is considered one of the most difficult mountains to climb, in the world. The mountain is notorious for its knife-edged ridges and steep pitches, and the final ascent of the summit pyramid involves very technical rock climbing.

First Ascent

The mountain was first climbed by Lionel Terray, and Jean Couzy of a French Makalu Expedition, on 15 May 1955.

Cho Oyu

Cho Oyu

6. Cho Oyu

  • Height: 8,188 m (26,864 ft)
  • Location: Nepal-China
  • First ascent: 19 October 1954
  • Death rate: 0.64%

Physical Traits and Challenges

At 8,188 metres above sea level, Cho Oyu is the sixth highest mountain in the world. The mountain stands in the Himalayan mountain range, 20 km west of Mount Everest, on the China-Nepal border. In Tibetan, Cho Oyu means "Turquoise Goddess."

It is considered one of the easiest and accessible climbs, and the best introductory peak for those aspiring to 8,000-meter climbs like Mount Everest. There are no real technical sections or objective dangers, and its easy ascent makes it an attractive climb.

Recently this mountain has become popular with snowboarders and ski mountaineers, due to its good snow condition and less objective risks.

First Ascent

The mountain was first climbed on 19 October 1954 by Herbert Tichy, Joseph Jochler, and Pasang Dawa Lama.

Dhaulagiri I

Dhaulagiri I

7. Dhaulagiri I

  • Height: 8,167 m (26,795 ft)
  • Location: Nepal
  • First ascent: 13 May 1960
  • Death rate: 2.94%

Physical Traits and Challenges

Dhaulagiri I is the world's seventh highest mountain at 8,167 metres above sea level. It is located in the Himalayan mountain range in west-central Nepal.

It is one of the lesser climbed 8,000 metre peaks because it is a little more remote climb than its more accessible cousin peaks. Annapurna (8,091 m) is just 34 km away, east of Dhaulagiri. The Kali Gandaki River, which is said to be the world's deepest river, flows between the two mountains, in the Kaligandaki Gorge.

Even the climb is not extremely technical, but it is steep and exposed. Many mountaineers have lost their lives on its flanks, from falls or avalanches, especially during the descent.

First Ascent

With the south wall of the mountain rising vertically, some 4,600 metres, and the steep sides of the peak, with bitterly cold weather, prevented any ascent to the summit, until May 13, 1960, when Kurt Diemberger, A. Schelbert, E. Forrer, Nawang Dorje, and Nyima Do, from a Swiss expedition, reached the summit.

Manaslu

Manaslu

8. Manaslu

  • Height: 8,163 m (26,781 ft)
  • Location: Nepal
  • First ascent: 9 May 1956
  • Death rate: 2.77%

Physical Traits and Challenges

At 8,163 metres above sea level, Manaslu is the eighth-highest mountain in the world. It is located in the Himalayas, in the west-central part of Nepal. The literal meaning of Manaslu is "mountain of the spirit."

It is considered as one of the accessible 8000-thousanders, but a challenging climb, in one of the most scenic regions of Nepal. It is good training climbing for Mount Everest.

The trek to Manaslu is an opportunity to enjoy quiet time, far away from the noisy trapping of the modern world, in pure bliss. It is a high-altitude climb but not an intimidating one, and there are fair chances that you can reach the summit.

First Ascent

Manaslu was first climbed by Toshio Imanishi and Gyalzen Norbu, two members of a Japanese expedition, on May 9, 1956. It is said that, just like the British consider Everest as their mountain, Manaslu has always been a mountain of Japanese.

Nanga Parbat

Nanga Parbat

9. Nanga Parbat

  • Height: 8,125 m (26,657 ft)
  • Location: Pakistan
  • First ascent: 3 July 1953
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

Nanga Parbat is the ninth-highest mountain in the world, at 8,125 metres at sea level. It is the western anchor of the Himalayas, in the Diamer District of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan.

It is also known as the "Killer Mountain", due to its difficult climb and a high number of fatalities. It is a challenging mountain composed of enormous bulk of ice and rock, and the danger of avalanches and poor weather conditions make it a difficult climb. It is separated from the Karakorum mountain range by the Indus River.

First Ascent

At least 30 climbers perished in the attempt to ascend the mountain, due to extreme weather conditions and frequent avalanches, before an Austrian climber Hermann Buhl made it to reach the summit in 1953.

Annapurna I

Annapurna I

10. Annapurna I

  • Height: 8,091 m (26,545 ft)
  • Location: Nepal
  • First ascent: 3 June 1950
  • Death rate: 4.05%

Physical Traits and Challenges

Annapurna I main, is the tenth-highest peak in the world, at 8,091 metres above sea level. Annapurna is a massif in the Himalayan range, in north-central Nepal that includes one peak above 8,000 metres, thirteen peaks above 7,000 metres, and sixteen above 6,000 metres.

It is one the most treacherous mountain to climb in the world, with the highest fatality rate of any eight-thousander. It is the most difficult climb, with the particular south face of Annapurna I, which is an extremely steep wall of rock that rises 3,000 metres. According to Guinness World Records, Annapurna I is the deadliest mountain on the planet.

First Ascent

The mountain takes the life of every one-in-three who makes it to the summit. The first successful attempt to reach the summit was made on 3 June 1950, by Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal.

Gasherbrum I

Gasherbrum I

11. Gasherbrum I

  • Height: 8,080 m (26,358 ft)
  • Location: Pakistan-China
  • First ascent: 5 July 1958
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

At 8,080 metres above sea level Gasherbrum I, is the eleventh-highest mountain in the world. It is also known as the "Hidden Peak" in reference to its extreme remoteness.

Located in the District Shigar of the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, it is part of the Gasherbrum massif, in the Karakorum region of the Himalaya.

Found in the wilderness of one of the most remote parts of Pakistan, Gasherbrum I is one of the remote and least popular of the 8,000 metre peaks. It is a technical and challenging climb, and only experienced mountaineers attempt to climb it, that's why only 200 successful attempts are recorded ever since.

First Ascent

The first ascent to the mountain was made by Pete Schoening and Andy Kauffman, of an American expedition, on July 5, 1958.

Broad Peak

Broad Peak

12. Broad Peak

  • Height: 8,051 m (26,414 ft)
  • Location: Pakistan-China
  • First ascent: 9 June 1957
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

Broad peak is the twelfth-highest mountain on the planet, at 8,051 metres above sea level. It is located in the Karakorum range, on the border of Pakistan and China. It is a part of the Gasherbrum massif.

It has about 1.5 kilometres long summit, that's why called "Broad Peak." It is considered as a relatively safer 8,000 metres peak, with a route being more straightforward, and with fewer objective hazards as compared to K2. It can be a great training and experimental climb to check how your body reacts to high altitudes, before going to K2 or Everest.

First Ascent

Broad Peak was first climbed by Fritz Wintersteller, Marcus Schmuck, Kurt Diemberger, and Hermann Buhl of an Austrian expedition, on June 9, 1957.

Gasherbrum II

Gasherbrum II

13. Gasherbrum II

  • Height: 8,034 m (26,358 ft)
  • Location: Pakistan-China
  • First ascent: 7 July 1956
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

At 8,034 metres above sea level, Gasherbrum II is thirteenth-highest mountain peak in the world. It is located in the Karakorum mountain range on the Pakistan-China border. It is the third highest peak of Gasherbrum massif.

Gasherbrum II is situated on the head of the Baltoro glacier. It is a remote but accessible 8,000 metres mountain. The route is straightforward and free of objective hazards, so if prepared well, there are reasonable summit rates in the clement weather. The climb provides a stunning yet remote and wild scenery of the Baltoro and Karakorum mountain range.

First Ascent

The mountain was first climbed by an Austrian expedition which included Josef Larch, Fritz Moravec, and Hans Willenpart, on 7 July, 1956.

Shishapangma

Shishapangma

14. Shishapangma

  • Height: 8,027 m (26,335 ft)
  • Location: China
  • First ascent: 2 May 1964
  • Death rate: (N/A)

Physical Traits and Challenges

Shishapangma, also know as Gosainthan, is the fourteenth-highest mountain in the world, at 8,027 metres above sea level. It is located in the Himalayan range, in the Tibet Autonomous Region of China.

It was the last eight-thousander to climb, due to its location in Tibet, and restriction on foreign visitors by authorities of Tibet Autonomous Region, and the Government of China.

With a very straightforward route and easy access without any technicality, it can be an ideal first 8000 metres peak to climb.

First Ascent

The mountain was first climbed by a Chinese expedition led by Xǔ Jìng, on 2 May 1964.

Sources


This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

© 2021 Amara

Comments

manatita44 from london on September 01, 2021:

Interesting! You've done a great job! I went 5,000 metres up Annapurna In Nepal and 5,000 metres up Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. Was in a hurry to get back, so didn't go to the top.

I led another Team of 17 Disciples to Kilimanjaro in 2013, but I had spent 6 weeks in Ghana and was very tired. So I didn't climb. 15 of my Team climbed and 9 succeeded. I took some photo- shots at the base and walked a few metres up. Excellent Article!

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Love received ;-) Thank you Misbah for your visit and warm words of appreciation..

Allah bless you always dear sis..

Misbah Sheikh from The World of Poets on August 27, 2021:

A very interesting and informative article about highest mountain peaks. I enjoyed the read. Sending Love to you, dear sister

Blessings always

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Thanks Ravi for stopping by and leaving comment.

You are right Ravi. And Hats off to those who have climbed all these fourteen, as its not really an easy task to do. Gratitude.

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Thank you very much Vidya g.. I am so pleased to know that you liked my hub. Thanks for your visit and comment. Highly appreciate it.

Ravi Rajan from Mumbai on August 27, 2021:

Interesting information Amara. The fact that most of these 8000s have been conquered shows the indomitable spirit of humankind to surmount the impossible.THanks for sharing.

VIDYA D SAGAR on August 27, 2021:

A very interesting and informative article. Just imagining climbing even one of the eight thousanders is so scary. The pictures you have shared are beautiful. Thanks for sharing Amara

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Thank you Nian, I am glad to know that you enjoyed the Hub and found it informative.. Love and blessings..

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Thanks Mr. Happy, I am really glad to see you here.

Yesss..!! you must visit Pakistan some day, its really beautiful. Northern areas of Pakistan are like hidden and raw gems of natural beauty. Also many visitors come here for expeditions of these majestic mountains.

Thanks for your visit n comment. Gratitude!!

Amara (author) from Pakistan on August 27, 2021:

Yes Peggy, recently I got a chance to fly over K2, Broad Peak, Gasherbrum I and II in plane, they are really stunning.

https://youtube.com/shorts/ofvMvDfyLEk?feature=sha...

Its a link to the video, I made of these majestic mountain.

Thanks for your visit, Blessing!

Nian from Pakistan on August 26, 2021:

All of these mountains are beautiful.

Very informative and interesting hub.

Thanks for sharing this beautiful hub.

Many Blessings.

Mr. Happy from Toronto, Canada on August 26, 2021:

Having lived through this pandemic and being stuck at home, I watched many mountain climbing documentaries. So, I learned of some like Annapurna, Broad Peak and K2 but some of the others I did not know about. Thanks for sharing the information. Maybe one day I will get to visit Pakistan. The mountains there are just amazing!

Peggy Woods from Houston, Texas on August 26, 2021:

It must be so much fun to see these majestic mountains in person. Thanks for showcasing them.

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