Fall Aspen Colors Hike on Beaver Creek Trail (Golden Gate Canyon State Park)

Updated on September 29, 2018
Hiking Colorado's Golden Gate Canyon: Scenery from Beaver Creek Trail
Hiking Colorado's Golden Gate Canyon: Scenery from Beaver Creek Trail

A Short Drive to Golden Gate Canyon State Park for Fall Color

Since Golden Gate Canyon State Park is only 30 miles from Denver, it’s great for a short trip to see the aspen color in the fall. I went there in October of 2015 and decided to take a short hike on Beaver Trail to see the change in the fall leaves. Most descriptions you see are short and vague, so I thought I'd tell you more about what you can expect if you hike this trail.

Some Basic Information About Golden Gate Canyon State Park

Since Golden Gate Canyon is a state park, there is a small admission fee per car. When I was there in 2015, it was $7.00 per car, and a person can pay at the Visitor’s Center or at a small booth near the entrance of the park. When it’s not busy, there is a little self-pay canister.

The Visitor’s Center is at about 8200 feet in altitude, and Reverend Ridge on west side of the park is around 9200 feet above sea level. At the Visitor’s Center you can get maps, ask questions of the rangers, buy firewood, get a drink, and use the restrooms (flush toilets!) Unfortunately, I didn’t see any kinds of snacks for sale or any drink vending machines, so bring plenty of food and drink with you. There are also some nice displays: topographical map of the area and information about the local wildlife (including taxidermied animals—just so you’re warned.)

Lodging at Golden Gate State Park

Golden Gate Canyon State Park has several lodging options: places to pitch your own tent, cabins, and yurts. No kitchens or sinks, but they do have a heater and electric lights. Flush toilets and showers are in walking distance. Also, a three-bedroom guest house with full kitchen opened recently. Our family enjoyed camping there in the summer, and I decided to take a trip there in the fall to see the aspen colors.

Cabins Available at Golden Gate Canyon State Park

One of the cabins available for rent at Golden Gate Canyon State Park
One of the cabins available for rent at Golden Gate Canyon State Park | Source

Fall Colors at the Golden Gate Canyon State Park Visitor’s Center

There is a beautiful stand of aspens near the Visitor’s Center, which are coupled with bushes that turn bright red. You almost have enough scenery right there to fill up your camera’s memory card. Here are the photos I took just wandering around the entrance to the park.

Golden aspen trees surround the Visitor's Center at Golden Gate Canyon State Park.
Golden aspen trees surround the Visitor's Center at Golden Gate Canyon State Park.

Picnic Area at the Visitor's Center

This picnic area at Golden Gate Canyon State Park features umbrellas and a grill.
This picnic area at Golden Gate Canyon State Park features umbrellas and a grill.

View of Aspen Color at Visitor's Center

An aspen grove provides lots of opportunity for fall color photos right from the grounds of the Visitor's Center at  Golden Gate Canyon State Park
An aspen grove provides lots of opportunity for fall color photos right from the grounds of the Visitor's Center at Golden Gate Canyon State Park

Bridge at the Visitor's Center

A short paved walk provides several different views of fall color. The walkway would be a perfect short outing for a person who is using a wheelchair.
A short paved walk provides several different views of fall color. The walkway would be a perfect short outing for a person who is using a wheelchair.

Fall Color Near the Parking Lot at Golden Gate Canyon State Park

I like to catch the small moments as well as the big vistas. Here we have a golden aspen leaf caught in the branch of a blue spruce. The red bush in the background highlights the colors.
I like to catch the small moments as well as the big vistas. Here we have a golden aspen leaf caught in the branch of a blue spruce. The red bush in the background highlights the colors.

A Variety of Fall Colors

I love the green and yellow juxtaposed against the red in this fall color tableau. The plants are all just by the parking lot at the Visitor's Center.
I love the green and yellow juxtaposed against the red in this fall color tableau. The plants are all just by the parking lot at the Visitor's Center.

Hiking Up Beaver Trail at Golden Gate Canyon State Park

Eventually I wanted to get out and see more. Since Beaver Trail was listed as relatively short (2.8 miles) and promised good views and aspen groves, I thought I’d give it a try. Even though one spur of the trail starts right out from the Visitor's Center, the ranger advised me to drive a half mile up the road and start off at Slough Pond so that I wouldn’t have to cross the highways at a blind curve.

The trail starts at about 8200 feet and gains around 1,000 feet in altitude. It is list as one of their “most difficult” hikes, which I guess is a matter of perspective. I’m middle-aged and not in the best shape, but I wouldn’t say it was that difficult. It did gain a lot of elevation, but I stopped pretty often. I did it in about 2 ½ hours because I wanted to stop and take lots of photos of the fall colors (and also to catch my breath). I’d have to say I’ve been on lots of steeper longer trails, and I’d rate Beaver Trail as medium. You’ll have to take into account that I live in Denver at 5200 feet, so the altitude wasn’t as much of an issue for me as for someone coming from sea level. If you are coming from the lowlands (anything under 5000 ft, IMHO), you may want to pick a more moderate hike, or plan to take lots and lots of rest stops.

Hiker's Checklist

The Visitor's Center at Golden Gate Canyon State Park includes this list of things a person should take on a hike to be prepared.
The Visitor's Center at Golden Gate Canyon State Park includes this list of things a person should take on a hike to be prepared.

Preparing for the Hike Up Beaver Trail

This display at the Visitor’s Center has some good tips, but you’ll want to know them before you get there. Here are the most important ones:

  • Take a walking stick. On the way down, Beaver Trail is steep, steep, steep, steep, with lots of loose pines needles and some gravel, an it’s easy to slip. I slipped three times and actually fell once. Lots of people use collapsible lightweight aluminum walking sticks.
  • Take water. It’s amazing how thirsty you can get at dry, high altitudes.
  • Take a jacket and a rain poncho. Even if you’re roasting at the trailhead, the weather can turn on a dime, and there is no such thing as a warm rain shower in the Rocky Mountains.
  • Have a companion. I went on a Friday, and the good news was that I had the trail all to myself. The bad news is that it would have been a long crawl to the car if I’d turned an ankle badly.

Fall Colors at Slough Pond, Beaver Trail, Golden Gate Canyon State Park

There is space for about a dozen cars in the parking lot as well as a picnic table and a pond that people can fish in. It is right by the highway, so not the best place for quiet and solitude.

Fellows fishing at Slough Pond near the trail head for Beaver Trail at Golden Gate Canyon State Park.
Fellows fishing at Slough Pond near the trail head for Beaver Trail at Golden Gate Canyon State Park.

Creek at Beaver Trail Head

Trees aren't the only plants that change colors in the fall. The bushes and grasses near streams and brooks  turn warm, earthy colors.
Trees aren't the only plants that change colors in the fall. The bushes and grasses near streams and brooks turn warm, earthy colors.

Beginning the Hike Up Beaver Trail

Trail head sign for Beaver Trail at Golden Gate Canyon State Park
Trail head sign for Beaver Trail at Golden Gate Canyon State Park

It’s time to start climbing. In fact, I’d recommend taking the first right-hand turn you come to on the trail, so that you take the steepest part of the trail up and the more gentle part of the loop going down. If you haven’t hiked in the Rocky Mountains much before, you’ll find that you are fighting gravity both ways—trying to get away from it as you go up, and working to keep it from pulling you down too rapidly as you descend.

At Points, Trail Conditions Make it Easy to Slip

Here's what I am talking about. Coming down, it's tricky to negotiate loose rocks and gravel. It's a lot steeper than it looks here, as well.
Here's what I am talking about. Coming down, it's tricky to negotiate loose rocks and gravel. It's a lot steeper than it looks here, as well.

Some Sights Along the Upward Portion of Beaver Trail

If you take the right fork, you’ll climb up through pine forest toward the top of the mountain. You’ll see a few aspens here and there, but you won’t see the vistas until you’ve reached the top and are heading down along the ridge.

The mountains are a whole different climate than the plains. I think that's why we are so drawn to them. It's rare to find this much moss near the trees in Denver.
The mountains are a whole different climate than the plains. I think that's why we are so drawn to them. It's rare to find this much moss near the trees in Denver.
Even though this photo was taken the first week of Oct., you can see that there is still some good leaf color in the aspens.
Even though this photo was taken the first week of Oct., you can see that there is still some good leaf color in the aspens.
I like to keep an eye out for color near the ground as well, like these red rose leaves.
I like to keep an eye out for color near the ground as well, like these red rose leaves.

Top of Beaver Trail, Golden Gate Canyon State Park

It seems to take 5 times longer than it should, but finally you reach the top. The trail is well-marked throughout, and it's easy to find your way.
It seems to take 5 times longer than it should, but finally you reach the top. The trail is well-marked throughout, and it's easy to find your way.

Heading Down the Other Side of Beaver Trail

Here is where you will see some vistas of the colorful aspen trees on the mountains across the valley. This side includes several switchbacks that make it easier to keep your footing while you descend.

You’ll notice that my long shots show a lot of haze. We had a wet spring and summer the years these were taken, but unfortunately California and Washington did not. Smoke in the west is going to be an unfortunate part of life for some time to come, I’m afraid. I would have preferred a clear day, but it’s worth documenting the time period.

I loved the ways the aspen color seemed to waft down this hillside.
I loved the ways the aspen color seemed to waft down this hillside.
The golden aspen in the foreground play off the leaf color in the background.
The golden aspen in the foreground play off the leaf color in the background.
Sometimes focusing on the leaf color in just one tree can be dramatic.
Sometimes focusing on the leaf color in just one tree can be dramatic.
Golden aspen leaves and the forest...makes it easy to imagine a fairy path.
Golden aspen leaves and the forest...makes it easy to imagine a fairy path.

The Story Behind Lichen

You can find many types of lichen growing on the rocks at Golden Gate State Canyon park.
You can find many types of lichen growing on the rocks at Golden Gate State Canyon park.

One of the first questions I got when I worked at the Denver Botanic Gardens was "How fast does lichen grow?" It was tricky to find in those days before the internet, but I'm proud to tell you I found the answer: 1 X 10 with an exponent of -14. Extremely slowly. So this lichen has likely been around hundred of years.

You may know that lichen is a composite of algae or bacteria (or both) and fungus. But did you know that children's author Beatrix Potter (of Peter Rabbit fame) was the first to figure this out? She was quite the amateur naturalist. She even wrote a paper to present at the Linnean Society of London, but they didn't allow women in their organization. So, she had to give it to a man to read to them.

So unfair! On the other hand, how many people remember anyone from the Linnean Society of London? Now who remembers Peter Rabbit? Maybe she got the upper hand in the end.

Another View, Farther Down Beaver Trail

Here is another scene you can capture as you hike down along the ridge on Beaver Trail.
Here is another scene you can capture as you hike down along the ridge on Beaver Trail.

End of the Trail

Near the trail head, a nice specimen of Colorado's state tree, the blue spruce.
Near the trail head, a nice specimen of Colorado's state tree, the blue spruce.

A Successful Hike of Beaver Trail at Golden Gate State Park

Now it’s 2.8 miles later, and you are back where you started. Remember, all these photos were taken the first weekend of October, and there was still a fair amount of color left. An early freeze or strong windstorm might move the peak season earlier. Here are some helpful links that talk about when you can expect to see the colors turn in the Rocky Mountains and include some other places to view the fall leaves.

Fall Color in Colorado Through the Eyes of a Renowned Photographer

Colorado Autumn
Colorado Autumn

John Fielder is THE name in Colorado photography, and it seems he has been almost everywhere in the state. This book is about 80 pages of his favorites over the last 20 years. I like that's it's not a huge coffee-table book, but a more manageable size to peruse.

 

After looking at the spread on pages 42-43, I've decided I definitely need to make a trip to Horse Ranch Park below Kebler Pass in the Gunnison National Forest in the fall. Beautiful reds, oranges, yellows and greens with rugged peaks as a backdrop.

A Nice Little Video Introduction to Golden Gate Canyon State Park

Another Short Video About Fall Colors at Golden Gate Canyon

Questions & Answers

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      • Adele Jeunette profile imageAUTHOR

        Adele Jeunette 

        3 years ago

        You pay a $7.00 fee for the day. If you're camping, I'm not sure if you have to pay that fee, but you do have to pay for a campsite, cabin, yurt or guesthouse. The fees are pretty reasonable.

      • Happy Moment profile image

        James 

        3 years ago from The Eastern Bypass

        The place looks very beautiful. I really like the mix of colors. What are the entry requirements?

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