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RV Camping in Death Valley National Park - With Photo Gallery

Updated on October 9, 2016
Stephanie Henkel profile image

As a full-time RV'er, Stephanie writes about many natural wonders to be found in the U.S. National Parks and Monuments are favorites.

Artist's Palette Drive at Death Valley National Park
Artist's Palette Drive at Death Valley National Park | Source

Death Valley Extremes

Death Valley National Park, on the California/Nevada border, is well known for encompassing the Badwater area. At 282 feet below sea level, Badwater is the lowest point in North America. Death Valley is also known for its extreme summer heat, when daytime temperatures can reach 120°F, and its extremely dry climate.

However, there is much more to Death Valley National Park for those who are interested in exploring its diversity. Visit in the winter months for pleasant temperatures and sunny days, and explore the badlands with ever-changing colors, see the snow-capped mountains, and enjoy the wildflower bloom. Below, I will discuss RV camping in Death Valley National Park and share photographs of some of the highlights of this most fascinating place.

RV Camping in Death Valley National Park

RV camping in Death Valley in the pleasant winter months is a wonderful way to enjoy the park. Since Death Valley has an average rainfall of less than 2" annually, you can usually expect sunny weather and comfortable temperatures in the winter months. RV camping in the Death Valley National Park campgrounds is low cost and allows you to be within easy driving distance of the most interesting points in the park.

Of the nine campgrounds in Death Valley National Park, six are suitable for RV camping. While they do not have RV hookups, generator use is allowed in all but the Texas Springs campground. (A great place for tenting and for those RVers who would like a quieter setting. Most campgrounds have drinking water available, restrooms with flush toilets and a dump station. Furnace Creek Campground is the only one that will accept reservations. (Call 1-877-444-6777). There is a 14 day limit at Furnace Creek Campground. Other Death Valley National Park campgrounds have a 30 day limit.

All the other National Park campgrounds are on a first come, first served basis. You can check the National Park Recreation data base for updated information on particular parks.

Do check at the National Park Visitor Center for up-to-date camping information!

RV-Friendly Campgrounds at Death Valley National Park

Sunset Campground is the perfect place to RV camp at Death Valley as it's conveniently located to many of the most important sights.
Sunset Campground is the perfect place to RV camp at Death Valley as it's conveniently located to many of the most important sights. | Source

National Park Campgrounds

Prices listed are eligible for the America the Beautiful Senior Discount.

  • Furnace Creek: Open all year*. Elevation 196 below sea level. Suitable any size RVs or tents. $18. (*Closed 2012, check with park service for details.)
  • Sunset Campground: Open Oct-Apr. Elevation 196 below sea level. Suitable any size RVs or tents. $12.
  • Texas Spring Campground: Open Oct-Apr. Elevation is at sea level. Limited number of RV sites. No generators allowed. $14.
  • Stovepipe Wells Campground: Open Oct-Apr. Elevation is at sea level. RV and tent sites. $12.
  • Mesquite Spring Campground: Open all year. Elevation 1800 ft. RV and tent sites. $12.
  • Wildrose Campground: Open all year. Elevation 4100 ft. No drinking water. RV and tent sites. Free.

We stayed at Sunset Campground during our visit to Death Valley. It is basically a huge flat parking area, but it is convenient to visit many of the sights in the Furnace Creek area. It was also easy to do day trips to almost any of the other areas of the park.

There are three other National Park campgrounds that are suitable for tents and may require high-clearance vehicles to access.

Other Campgrounds

If you want to camp where there are RV hookups, there is one concession-run campground in Death Valley: Stovepipe Wells RV Park. There is also a private RV park, Panamint Springs Resort, that has full hookups. These two privately run campgrounds can fill up during the busy season, so be sure to check for availability before heading out.

Gas and Food in Death Valley

Plan ahead before heading out from your campground or hotel on a day trip!

Death Valley is a wonderful place to explore and there are many interesting day trips to do once you have settled on a campground to serve as your base. Be forewarned that there are only a few places to get gas and food, so be sure to start out with a full tank of gas, and pack a picnic lunch, snacks and plenty to drink before starting out.

When you are planning to RV camp at Death Valley, be sure to bring groceries and staples to last through your stay as there are only limited groceries available in the park.

Gas is available at Furnace Creek, Stovepipe Wells, Furnace Creek, Beatty, Nevada and Tonopah, Nevada. Scotty’s Castle does sell snacks and sandwiches, but not gas.

Death Valley Trivia

  • In 1996 there were 40 days when the temperature was 120°.
  • In the summer of 2001 there were 154 days with temperatures over 100°.
  • The highest ground temperature recorded at Furnace Creek on July 15, 1972 was 201° with a maximum air temperature of 128° that day.
  • In 1953, no rainfall was recorded at the Greenland Ranch weather station.
  • The name "Death Valley" was given to the area by a group of pioneers who became lost and thought they would die there. When they were rescued and led to safety, the story goes that one of them said, "Goodbye, Death Valley." The name stuck.

Places Worth Seeing in Death Valley National Park

Enjoy this picture gallery and virtual tour of Death Valley's beauty and history.

Artist's Palette and Artist's Drive

View of Artist's Palette from parking area
View of Artist's Palette from parking area | Source
Entrance to Artist's Drive
Entrance to Artist's Drive | Source
Artist's Drive as the sun goes down.
Artist's Drive as the sun goes down. | Source
Source

Late afternoon sun brings out the beautiful colors along Artist’s Drive. At the parking area, we stop to admire the view of Artist’s Palette. Here many colored pigments from volcanic deposits, iron salts and mica have painted the hills in a rainbow of colors. I snap many photographs as the changing light and shadows bring out different colors. When we got home, it’s hard to believe that these views are real…but they are!

As the sun goes down, we continue on the drive, stopping occasionally to get out of the Jeep and admire the nearby hills as well as the distant views of snow-capped mountains.

Various mineral pigments have colored these volcanic deposits. Iron salts produce the reds, pinks and yellows. Decomposing mica causes the green. Manganese supplies the purple.
Various mineral pigments have colored these volcanic deposits. Iron salts produce the reds, pinks and yellows. Decomposing mica causes the green. Manganese supplies the purple. | Source

Zabriskie Point

Bill stands at Zabriskie Point near sundown.
Bill stands at Zabriskie Point near sundown. | Source

Located in the Furnace Creek area, Zabriskie Point is a maze of eroded badlands. Here is one of the most famous views in Death Valley. The colors are astonishing, particularly at sunset and sunrise when the angled sunlight lights up the colors. There is a parking area and the viewpoint is only a short walk up the hill. Be sure to wear closed-toe shoes for this walk, as loose gravel can make walking in sandals or flip flops uncomfortable.

Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park
Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park | Source
Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park
Zabriskie Point, Death Valley National Park | Source

Dante's View

Dante's View. Here is a spectacular view of Death Valley. The white on the floor of the valley are the salt flats, not snow!
Dante's View. Here is a spectacular view of Death Valley. The white on the floor of the valley are the salt flats, not snow! | Source

Typical of the diversity of Death Valley National Park, Dante’s view is one of the high points of the park at 5,000 feet above the valley. The winding road to the top of the mountain leads to a spectacular view of Death Valley. Don’t try this in your RV as the road has hairpin turns and is only open to vehicles less than 25 ft. in length.

In the distance, you can see the Panamint Mountains towering above the valley, often with snowy caps. The highest mountain in Death Valley, Telescope Peak, rises 11,049 feet above the lowest point in the park, creating yet another dramatic contrast in Death Valley.

Badwater

Badwater is the lowest point in North America, 282 feet below sea level. Here the summer air temperatures will rise to 120°F and above while the ground temperature on the salt flats can be much higher. When there are heavy rainstorms, a temporary lake might form on the salt flats, but it will disappear quickly.

Rock salt spires of Devil's Golf Course.
Rock salt spires of Devil's Golf Course. | Source
Devil's Golf Course is not a place you wold want to walk.
Devil's Golf Course is not a place you wold want to walk. | Source
A wooden boardwalk meanders alongside Salt Creek where you can see the rare little pupfish swimming.
A wooden boardwalk meanders alongside Salt Creek where you can see the rare little pupfish swimming. | Source

Mosaic Canyon

Stephanie walking the narrow trail through Mosaic Canyon at Death Valley.
Stephanie walking the narrow trail through Mosaic Canyon at Death Valley. | Source
The narrow trail through Mosaic Canyon at Death Valley.
The narrow trail through Mosaic Canyon at Death Valley. | Source

Scotty's Castle at Death Valley

Scotty's Castle is a fairy-tale house complete with towers.
Scotty's Castle is a fairy-tale house complete with towers. | Source

This beautiful Spanish-style mansion is named after prospector, Walter Scott, “Death Valley Scotty,” who claimed that he built the castle from gold from secret gold mines. Actually, it was built by his friend, Albert Mussey Johnson, as a vacation home during the 1920’s. Tours of the castle are available for a fee of $11-15 per person for adults. Pass-holder and children’s fees are lower. You must take a tour in order to see the inside of the house.

Wildflowers and Plants

There are over 1000 different kinds of plants growing in Death Valley and 50 of them are endemic, unique to Death Valley. Occasionally, the winter rains will be heavier than normal, creating the right conditions for a spectacular wildflower bloom. This happened in 1996 and 2005. Even in average years, the months of February and March will bring out wildflowers in the desert, along the roadsides and nestled among the stones and rocks. We happened to be there when wildflowers were just starting to bloom, and enjoyed finding them in unexpected places. Many of the flowers are very tiny, and can easily be overlooked if you are driving. Do get out and walk some of the trails, but be careful where you step!

Wildflowers along the roadside.
Wildflowers along the roadside. | Source
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park.
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park. | Source
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park.
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park. | Source
Grasses and brush along the roadside.
Grasses and brush along the roadside. | Source
Grasses and brush along the roadside.
Grasses and brush along the roadside. | Source
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park.
Wildflowers at Death Valley National Park. | Source

Harmony Borax Works

20-mule-team borax wagons at the Harmony Borax plant, Death Valley, California
20-mule-team borax wagons at the Harmony Borax plant, Death Valley, California | Source

Borax was found in Furnace Creek (previously named Greenland) in 1881. The Harmony Borax Works was built by William t. Coleman. There, in 1884, the borax ore was processed by a workforce of 40 men who produced 3 tons of borax every day. However, the summer temperatures were so hot, the processing water would not cool enough to allow the borax crystals to form, and the plant was eventually moved out of the valley. The most daunting task was getting the borax out of Death Valley and through the Mojave desert by wagons pulled by mule teams. This is how the 20-mule team borax became the famous symbol of the borax industry. Today the remains of the Harmony Borax works still stand and visitors to Death Valley can see the wagons and parts of the plant at the original town site which has been placed on the Register of Historic Places.

20-Mule Team Canyon Drive. Death Valley, California.
20-Mule Team Canyon Drive. Death Valley, California. | Source

Wildrose Charcoal Kilns

Beehive Charcoal Kilns
Beehive Charcoal Kilns | Source
Charcoal Kilns
Charcoal Kilns | Source

The beehive shape of the well-preserved charcoal kilns is a unique sight. The 25 ft. high kilns were buildt to produce charcoal used in the processing of lead and silver from nearby mines. It is believed that the kilns were only in operation for a short time before another source of fuel was found. Although the actual settlement, if there was one, has disappeared, the ten charcoal kilns stand in perfect condition.

Monthly Temperature and Rainfall Table for Death Valley National Park

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Annual Ave.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average High
65°
72°
80°
90°
99°
109°
115°
113°
106°
92°
76°
65°
90°
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average Low
39°
46°
53°
62°
71°
80°
88°
85°
75°
62°
48°
39°
62°
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Record High
89°
97°
102°
112°
122°
128°
134°
127°
123°
113°
97°
88°
134°
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Record Low
15°
25°
30°
35°
42°
49°
62°
64°
41°
32°
24°
19°
15°
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Precipitation
0.27"
0.35"
0.25"
0.12"
0.08"
0.04"
0.11"
0.1
0.14"
0.11"
0.18"
0.19"
1.94"
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Table lists average monthly temperatures and average yearly rainfall in Death Valley National Park.
Death Valley view
Death Valley view | Source

Death Valley National Park

A markerDeath Valley National Park Sunset Campground -
Sunset Campground, Death Valley National Park, Death Valley, CA 92328, USA
get directions

Sunset Campground is a National Park Campground with no facilities.

Hope You Enjoyed the Virtual Tour

I hope you've enjoyed this virtual tour of some of the amazing sights at Death Valley National Park. When you are able to camp here with your RV and visit in person, you will find many more beautiful and exciting places to see and explore.

Happy Trails!

A typical view of Death Valley.
A typical view of Death Valley. | Source

Have You Been to Death Valley?

What was your experience at Death Valley?

See results

Have You Enjoyed Your Virtual Visit? Please Leave a Comment!

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    • thumbi7 profile image

      JR Krishna 5 years ago from India

      Wow! Breath taking views! beautiful description! But the name of the place is creepy and frightening

      Why is it known as death valley?

      Voted up and sharing

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Thumbi7 - I'm glad that you enjoyed the photographs of Death Valley. The name is a little frightening, just as the area must have been frightening to the first people to try to cross it. The name was given to the valley by pioneers who became lost and thought they would die there. As they left, the story goes that they said, "Goodbye, Death Valley." Thanks for your question - I will add this bit of trivia to the Hub!

    • tammyswallow profile image

      Tammy 5 years ago from North Carolina

      Every time I read one of your hubs and see your photos, I want to partake in the RV life. I really hope to do this in retirement. I have been to the Grand Canyon, but not Death Valley. Gorgeous!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      The Finance Hub - Glad you enjoyed my hub about RV camping in Death Valley. Thanks for the read and the votes!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Tammyswallow - The Grand Canyon is yet another wonder of the U.S. and so different from any other national park. Glad you enjoyed the virtual visit to Death Valley - I'd love to meet you on the road someday! Thanks for stopping in to comment!

    • LadyLyell profile image

      LadyLyell 5 years ago from George, South Africa

      Thank you for taking me on a tour of Death Valley as this is as close as I am going to get to a visit.

      The world is full of wonderful places and by giving an over view plus photos as you have of this special spot all can enjoy.

      The colors in the mountains are amazing!

      Enjoy the memories!

    • profile image

      diogenes 5 years ago

      Well presented and resources article with great illustrations.

      I drove passed that area several times when I lived in the States. I love dry areas and lived in Baja for 5 years, as well as San Diego, etc.

      It's nice to know there are still places your can go - cheaply - with minimum restrictions, in the US...I have heard the parks like Yellowstone, marvellous as it is, has so many restrictions the experience has become arduous and expensive (but not to be missed!)

      I don't expect I will make Death Valley now, but I liked reading about it

      Bob

    • profile image

      iamaudraleigh 5 years ago

      Great hub, great pics! Voted up!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Ladylyell - I'm so glad you enjoyed the photographs of Death Valley National Park. It is truly an amazing place and the changing colors of the mountains and the desert are enough to inspire anyone. Thanks so much for your comments!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Bob - I think that Death Valley is sometimes passed up in favor of more glamorous National Parks, but we found it to be well worth the visit. While there are no spouting geysers or grand canyons, the carved hills, beautiful colors and amazing vistas make it a great place to explore. Camping in the Death Valley National park is still very reasonable, and, at least when we were there, the park was not overrun with visitors. Glad you enjoyed reading about it. Thanks for your comments!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      iamaudraleigh - Glad you enjoyed the photographs of Death Valley National Park! Thanks for the read and for your votes!

    • stephhicks68 profile image

      Stephanie Hicks 5 years ago from Bend, Oregon

      Stephanie, I always love your RV hubs! This one is now a favorite of mine. I've wanted to visit Death Valley and your photographs are breathtaking and inspirational. Love all the facts and information you've included to supplement your personal experience. Top notch and rated up, up, up!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Hi StephHicks,

      Our RVing trip to Death Valley National Park was a unique and enjoyable experience, and I loved being able to relive it by sharing my photographs! Thanks so much for your kind comments and votes. Your ongoing support means a lot to me!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 5 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Stephanie,

      You did a marvelous job with this hub! I'm going to link it to my Death Valley hub. This is SUCH a beautiful and interesting national park and your photos are wonderful. Like you, I took lots of photos. We were there in late May and the flowers were amazing. Voted beautiful and awesome and will share this hub with my followers plus tweet.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Hi Peggy,

      I also thought that our hubs on Death Valley should be linked as you've shown another perspective. The spring flowers were just starting to bloom when we were there ...I'm jealous that you were there to see the full bloom! Thanks so much for the comments and for sharing!

    • Brett Winn profile image

      Brett Winn 5 years ago from US

      This was magnificent ... I hope you get a Hub of the Day for it! Thank you so much!

    • point2make profile image

      point2make 5 years ago

      Another great hub Stephanie. I enjoyed the photos and your information on the various choices throughout the park were excellent. Thanks for the info and thanks for another great RV hub.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Brett Winn - Thanks so much for the complement! I really do love to share my photographs of our beautiful National Parks as it gives me a chance to relive our delightful explorations. So glad you enjoyed the virtual tour of Death Valley! Thanks for visiting!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Point2make - I'm so glad you enjoyed this hub on Death Valley National Park! It is truly an amazingly diverse place with endless opportunity for exploration. Thanks so much for the read and for your comments!

    • leahlefler profile image

      leahlefler 5 years ago from Western New York

      What a fantastic hub! I love your pictures - I didn't realize how colorful Death Valley could be! The salt flats are really cool - I love how the white floor looks like snow. I love traveling vicariously, particularly when we're trapped in the throes of winter!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
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      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Leahlefler - I'm so glad you enjoyed my photographs of Death Valley National Park! The many different mineral deposits can add many colors to the rock formations there. Sometimes it's hard to capture colors because of the bright sun. I found that colors show up better when photographed in early morning or late afternoon. It was great having you along on this virtual adventure! Thanks for your comments!

    • alocsin profile image

      alocsin 5 years ago from Orange County, CA

      Your hub and photos make me want to go out there. And it looks like RV camping avoids the heat and inconvenience. Voting this Up and Useful.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 5 years ago from USA

      Alocsin - RV camping in National Parks is one way to bring some of the comforts of life along with you, but, since we camped without electric hookups, we did not have air conditioning or heat unless we ran our generator. Luckily, the winter months are very comfortable, and we were fine without either one. Thanks for your comment and votes!

    • mperrottet profile image

      Margaret Perrottet 4 years ago from Pennsauken, NJ

      I'm planning another cross country trip for hopefully 2014, and this is one of the places we're going to see. We're going to try to go in March so that we can see the flowers. Great hub - I love the pictures! Voted up, useful, interesting, beautiful and awesome!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 4 years ago from USA

      Mperrottet - Death Valley National Park is certainly worth the trip! It's a huge park with many different terrains, beautiful colors and stunning views. If you go in March, you have a good chance of seeing wildflowers in bloom, too. You can check the NP website to track to blooming times. Thanks so much for stopping to view my hub and photographs. Wishing you a wonderful trip!

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      Hi Stephanie,

      I just linked this great hub to my newest one showcasing the 8 national parks in California. Thought that you might wish to know.

    • thougtforce profile image

      Christina Lornemark 2 years ago from Sweden

      Wonderful photos! I would love to go there one day but for now I enjoy the virtual tour. This hub is stunning and so beautiful, you have captured the beauty in Death Valley. It must be an experience to camp in such a place.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Thoughtforce - Many think of Death Valley as a barren wasteland, but it is really a most beautiful place. Thank you for visiting my hub and taking a virtual tour. I hope someday you will see it in person.

    • Joel Diffendarfer profile image

      Joel Diffendarfer 2 years ago from Ft Collins, Colorado

      Now this, like many of your hubs...IS...what I want my kids and grand kids to know...Can you imagine a junior high school or high school "class", that consisted of your hubs, would be like... The hope and lives it would change...Great Work...Art, History, Math, all combined. Love it!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Joel Diffendarfer - Thanks so much for your kind words. Nothing could be more sad than kids growing up without knowing the joys of the great outdoors. I believe that our National Parks are one of the best ways to experience the vast and diverse beauty of nature. Death Valley National Park has an amazing history, too. I do appreciate your comments!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 2 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      These pictures are awesome. Anyone planning to visit there will definitely find these information useful. I felt I have visited the place after reading this.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Aesta1 - Death Valley National Park is a unique and beautiful place, and well worth a visit. I'm glad that you enjoyed my photographs and the article. Thanks for stopping in to read and comment!

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 2 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      Oh my, Stephanie - this hub is absolutely spectacular! I've driven through parts of death valley several times not knowing about the National Park. I'll be sure to take a trip to this area again. Wonderful! Will do plenty of sharing.

      Thank you,

      Audrey

    • Don Bobbitt profile image

      Don Bobbitt 2 years ago from Ruskin Florida

      Great Hub. My wife and I have crossed to the West Coast twice over the years, and I am trying to put together a plan for another trip this Summer/Winter/Summer.

      We would love to make Death Valley a part of our trip, but right now, I am dealing with some problems with our old Winnie and getting it up to snuff for such a trip.

      DON

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Thanks so much for your comments, Audrey! As I look at my past photos of Death Valley National Park, I know I want to return, too. It is certainly a unique and beautiful place.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Hi Don - I do hope you'll be able to make your cross country trek again this year. Death Valley National Park is definitely a worthwhile stop, especially if you can do it in the winter months when it's not so hot. Happy Trails to you! :)

    • Marcy Goodfleisch profile image

      Marcy Goodfleisch 2 years ago from Planet Earth

      Oh gosh - Steph, I've never thought of camping in Death Valley - I've always thought it was a bit too hazardous a terrain and climate! I've camped in Big Bend, though, and I can see that Death Valley would offer the same stark beauty and great experience. If done the right way, of course!

    • Availiasvision profile image

      Jennifer Arnett 2 years ago from California

      What a lovely group of pictures. Death Valley is somewhere I would really like to see. I would especially like to see Scotty's castle and Zabriski's point. Your pictures of Zabriski's picked up the beautiful colors in the rocks. They look painted. The boardwalk also looks like a lot of fun.

      I noticed that you added colorful dividers to your hubs. How did you do that? As a "picture?" It looks really cool.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Marcy Goodfleisch - There is so much to see in Death Valley National Park, it's certainly worth a trip. If you are camping, plan to go in the cooler months for a more enjoyable experience. Temperatures in the late spring, summer and fall can be quite hot! Have fun!

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 2 years ago from USA

      Availiasvision - Zabriski's point is one of my favorite places in Death Valley National Park. It's particularly beautiful at sunset when the late afternoon light enhances the colors of the rocks. Yes, I did add picture dividers to my hub using the photo capsure. Hubpages doesn't necessarily approve of this, but I like to use dividers sometimes, and I've kept them in this hub. I'm glad you like them.

    • Paul Kuehn profile image

      Paul Richard Kuehn 13 months ago from Udorn City, Thailand

      Hi Stephanie! This is an absolutely fantastic hub with great accompanying pictures. The closest I have been to Death Valley is Las Vegas and that was in 2000 and 2001. Out of curiosity, what is the average distance across Death Valley? I can appreciate how hot Death Valley is during the summer because the average temperatures in Udonthani in northeastern Thailand where I now live have been 106/85 during the past week and it is only the middle of April here! It would really be nice to tour Death Valley when I am in the southwestern part of the U.S. again now that I have your guide. I am sharing this hub with HP followers and on Facebook.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 13 months ago from Massachusetts

      Stephanie, what a beautiful place. Wonderful job with this hub. I love the names; Furnace Creek, Stovepipe Wells, Dante's View, Devils Golf Course. Will have to add this to my list of places to get to. Love the photos.

    • fpherj48 profile image

      Paula 13 months ago from Beautiful Upstate New York

      Hello Stephanie. How's our Queen of Campers? This is an especially fascinating read and the photos are simply breathtaking! You've done a wonderful job of encouraging travel & camping to Death Valley National Park. I'm sure other campers have found this exciting! Paula

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 13 months ago from USA

      Paul Kuehn - Thanks for your comments, Paul. If you visit Las Vegas again, Death Valley is about a 2 hour drive from there. It's a long day trip, but there is a lot you could see. Death Valley is about 120 miles long, with many outstanding features to see. I hope you are able to visit someday.

    • Stephanie Henkel profile image
      Author

      Stephanie Henkel 13 months ago from USA

      fpherk48 - Well, I'm just fine, Paula! Our country's national parks are all so beautiful. We love visiting them, and I love to feature them on my hubs. This week, admission is free for National Parks. It's a great opportunity to visit one. Thanks for your comments -- it's always great to hear from you!

    • Don Bobbitt profile image

      Don Bobbitt 13 months ago from Ruskin Florida

      This year we're going to do a East Coat Loop up to VA and back down for a few months. Got the motorhome ready, but I just had one minor knee surgery, and I need another bigger one on my shoulder.

      Imagine me hooking up and unhooking across country with one functioning arm! LOL! Hoping, AGAIN to head out after my my new shoulder.

      An aging camper is a sad thing to watch sometimes, but at least I dress well for my travels! LOL!

      DON

    • profile image

      Debbie 7 months ago

      Sounds wonderful. Thanks for all the useful information.

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